npr:

During the 1950’s, with vinyl scare, Russians began recording rock n’ roll, jazz, and boogie woogie on used x-rays that they gathered from hospitals and doctors offices. They would cut a crude circle out with manicure scissors, using a cigarette to burn a hole. 
"How Soviet Kitchens Became Hotbeds of Dissent And Culture" via The Kitchen Sisters

Awesome.

npr:

During the 1950’s, with vinyl scare, Russians began recording rock n’ roll, jazz, and boogie woogie on used x-rays that they gathered from hospitals and doctors offices. They would cut a crude circle out with manicure scissors, using a cigarette to burn a hole. 

"How Soviet Kitchens Became Hotbeds of Dissent And Culture" via The Kitchen Sisters

Awesome.

Reblogged from NPR

ritaelise:

Papercraft, Maud Vantours | via: nevver

Reblogged from

Ai Weiwei Responds to Vase Dropper

hyperallergic:

A GIF version of unverified video footage found by the BBC of Caminero dropping the Ai vase (GIF by Hrag Vartanian for Hyperallergic)

In his first remarks since local artist Maximo Caminero smashed a vase in one of his artworks on view at the Pérez Art Museum Miami (PAMM), Ai Weiwei told the Associated Press that he doesn’t understand or agree with the vandal’s actions. ”Damaging other people’s…

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Reblogged from Hyperallergic LABS
artruby:

Erwina Ziomkowska, Untitled

artruby:

Erwina Ziomkowska, Untitled

Reblogged from Art Ruby
free-parking:

Mona Hatoum, You Are Still Here, 1994, etched mirrored glass, metal

free-parking:

Mona Hatoum, You Are Still Here, 1994, etched mirrored glass, metal

Reblogged from free parking
I still catch myself feeling sad about things that don’t matter anymore.
— Kurt Vonnegut (via razorshapes)
Reblogged from R.S.

likeafieldmouse:

Motoi Yamamoto

Yamamoto’s works are mostly temporary, intricate, large-scale installations, or, “salt labyrinths”. 

"Salt, a traditional symbol for purification and mourning in Japanese culture, is used in funeral rituals and by sumo wrestlers before matches. It is frequently placed in small piles at the entrance to restaurants and other businesses to ward off evil spirits and to attract benevolent ones. 

Yamamoto forged a connection to the substance while mourning the death of his sister at the age of twenty-four from brain cancer, and began to create art out of salt in an effort to preserve his memories of her.

His art radiates an intense beauty and tranquility, but also conveys something ineffable, painful, and endless.”

Artist’s statement: 

“Drawing a labyrinth with salt is like following a trace of my memory. Memories seem to change and vanish as time goes by; however, what I seek is to capture a frozen moment that cannot be attained through pictures or writings. What I look for at the end of the act of drawing could be a feeling of touching a precious memory.”

THIS GUY.

Reblogged from not shaking the grass